This is why I teach financial literacy…

“We were not taught financial literacy in school. It takes a lot of work and time to change your thinking and to become financially literate”

– Robert Kiyosaki –

There’s a lot of financial wisdom being shared all over the web. Tips, tricks, strategies, how to guides and step-by-step tutorials just to name a few. I’ve written a few blog posts about these things myself. Many of them offering valid advice and with the intent to help the average person gain financial wisdom.

But it’s not the how that’s the issue here, it’s the why.

What’s holding you back from accumulating financial wealth up to this point? It’s probably because you were never taught financial literacy when you were growing up. We are trained and conditioned from adolescence to become good employees that are dependent on getting a good job that we can survive off of.

Imagine this…

You’ve been working for this corporation for 24 years. You’ve been a solid employee that’s always arrived on time, worked hard and built up a reputation in your field as “the go to guy”. When shifts needed to be covered and staffing was short, you were the one who came through time and time again. You were the pinnacle of the ideal employee.

Now, you’ve just started working a 12 hour shift because they needed you to help them come in early to get things caught up. You step it up and manage to get things caught up to where they need to be and that’s just the first three hours into the shift. You work tirelessly all night to keep the chaos under control and finally get to the end of your shift. You’re called into an urgent meeting before you punch out just to be told you’re being let go.

Yep… been there… done that.

The problem with that is what happens when we no longer have that “good job” that we rely on to pay for our cost of living expenses? What were we taught to do when that happens? EXACTLY!

You see, the answer to that is to get another job that you have to hope won’t be lost again. Just continue to participate in the rat race until one day you can no longer work for whatever reason that becomes. And if you have no retirement savings to fall back on… then what?

You’re not broke because you can’t build wealth, you’re financially strapped because you weren’t prepared to build wealth from a young age. You were led to believe that making a lot of money means spending a lot of money on frivolous things and luxurious items because “you only live once” (YOLO).

The problem with that is people want to live the rich life without knowing how to manage their money like the rich.

The truth is that you don’t become wealthy because you make a lot of money. A person becomes wealthy because of how they manage the money that they make. The sad reality is that most don’t know how and that’s why people who make six and seven figure incomes still end up broke.

There are several key factors when it comes to building wealth, but two of them are extremely important. One of them is discipline. The fact is that no matter how well educated you are, if you’re not disciplined enough to manage your money properly, you won’t achieve financial freedom.

That’s where I kept messing up on my past attempts to build wealth. I didn’t focus on the discipline part and sabotaged my financial gains time and time again. I should be a lot further down the path to being financially independent than I am, but I haven’t given up and learn from my failures.

Which brings me to the second key factor to building wealth… perseverance. The ability to not give up and begin to rebuild a financial foundation with a better understanding of what it takes to be successful on this journey.

Too many people just accept that they will never become rich because they have the wrong mindset. Once again, they were conditioned to believe that financial wealth is for the “privileged” and the “lucky”. Simply because they were never taught financial literacy.

Because I know what it’s like to endure financial hardships and also because of my failed attempts to accumulate wealth in the past, I’m very empathetic to those who don’t know what they don’t know. It’s become my passion to educate and teach financial literacy so that others can avoid the mistakes I’ve made.

My goal isn’t just to achieve financial freedom for myself, but to achieve it with as many other people as possible a long the way. There’s no joy in taking the journey all alone.

The mission is to keep on teaching financial literacy as I make progress, however slowly, and track my progress to share with the readers of this blog. I believe in the philosophy of you teach what you learn as you learn what to teach.

In order for others to follow the path I forge, I feel it’s my duty to provide markers towards progress. Achieving financial freedom is a slow momentum process that gradually accelerates over time.

People don’t become successful because they quit. Building wealth isn’t easy but it also isn’t hard either. It’s about laying brick upon brick gradually over time. There is no “get rich quick” short cut to wealth that doesn’t come with high risk for the “reward”. Only fools fall for the dream of “overnight success”.

So the why in why I teach financial literacy is because I don’t want people to stay trapped in the rat race until they die. I want to see wealth and prosperity for the masses and less suffering.

I ask for you to be there with me as we lift up others who follow our lead and give back to those in need with encouragement, so that we can be the change we want to see in the world.

As I like to say… “the journey begins with the first step”.

If you see value in this article then please be sure to like and subscribe to the blog if you haven’t done so already. I’ll be putting up more wealth building posts in the future and you can have them delivered straight to your email account.

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I’ll see you in the next post. Until next time… be sure to comment below and let’s get some dialogue going. I’m curious to know, what’s your opinion on teaching financial literacy?


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Payday Plan Post 9/11/2020…

“It’s not your salary that makes you rich. It’s your spending habits”

– Charles A. Jaffe –

As the paydays continue to come and go… it’s time to do an update since the last payday plan post.

– Designated funds from this payday –

  • 401K contribution $177.30 – current value $15.637.43
  • Fidelity brokerage account $55.00 – current value $210.81
  • Acorns Roth IRA $0 – current value $103.35
  • Acorns investment account $0 – current value $142.77

A part of what I earn is mine to keep

You can create your own acorns account by clicking here.

Once again I’m not putting a lot into my brokerage account as I continue to pay down my debts. But I will maintain paying myself first no matter how little it might be. I do contribute 6% of my pretax income to my 401k since my employer matches dollar for dollar up to 6%. Unfortunately the employer match has been suspended until further notice due to the covid crisis.

I wound up selling my share of BIGC because I had read some articles discussing the share price being over valued and predictions of a massive decline in the share price. I wound up selling at 110.09 which isn’t a bad profit since I purchased it at 72.81.

I took that and added it to some dry powder I had sitting in my brokerage account to pick up a share of apple for 132.91 after the apple stock split but the share price started tanking right after I opened my position. I didn’t want to see all of my BIGC profit vanish so I sold AAPL at 122.99… it’s currently at 113.60 at the time of this writing.

I decided to take that and what I had left sitting on the sidelines in my brokerage account and purchased shares of BRG which is a REIT stock that pays an annual dividend of $.65 per share. I opened a position and purchased 23 shares at $7.56 per share. It’s time to start building that passive income portfolio.

I just added 7 more shares of BRG at $7.33 per share after adding the $55.00 to my account to make an even 30 shares. I’ll probably start picking up 1-2 shares a payday from this point on to add to that position. I’m researching some other stocks I’d like to open positions on in the coming paydays.

I’m not adding to the acorns account on this payday.

Be sure to keep track with me and if you’d like, share your payday plan in the comments section below.

Until next time… be sure to comment below and let’s get some dialogue going.

Why SlowFI should be your path to financial freedom…

“Be not afraid of going slowly. Be afraid only of standing still”

– Chinese Proverb –

Let’s face it, we all dream of living “the good life” of financial freedom. The unfortunate fact is that most people won’t ever get to that point in life because they were never taught financial literacy. Not only that, society has been conditioned to believe that taking short cuts to “get rich quick” is the ONLY way to achieve financial freedom. The reality is that unless one has been fortunate enough to be born into wealth, most wealthy people achieve their status over time by being financially disciplined and meticulous planning.

But before we go any further, let’s define the term. 

Slow FI: When someone utilizes the incremental financial freedom they gain along the journey to financial independence to live happier and healthier lives, do better work, and build strong relationships.

The journey to financial freedom is exactly that… a journey and not a race. If you haven’t done so already, it’s imperative that you start investing now so that your wealth portfolio has time to grow and use compound interest in your favor.

Don’t be fooled into believing that you can put it off until later because you’re young. That’s the ideal time to start! Building a wealth portfolio should be done meticulously but also enjoyable. Adding money each payday and watching it grow over time should be as much of a priority as paying down debts each month. And once you’ve achieved debt freedom, the money put towards those debt payments should then be put towards your wealth portfolio.

If you’ve read any of my other posts then you should know that I’m an advocate of the “richest man in bablylon” philosophy of paying yourself first regardless of your debts and putting that money to work for you. I’ve disciplined myself to do this and I implore you to do the same. I know I sound like a broken record by always repeating this, but repetition is one of the keys to learning and forming habits.

We live in a quick buck society with instant gratification in high demand. But the reality of it all is that many people are managing to just get by pay check to pay check if even that. They dream big but often take no action and later in life have no financial reserves to fall back on.

As a reader of this blog, my goal is to help you avoid that lifestyle. I’m dedicated to getting this philosophy out and influence the counter culture belief that it’s okay to build wealth slowly and enjoy life in the process.

Dave Ramsey has a saying that goes like this “live your life today like no one else, so that you can live your life tomorrow like no one else”. It’s a very simple concept, yet so enlightening.

As I take this journey of building wealth from scratch slowly, I’m documenting it with my payday post plans. I post these every other Friday which consist of how much I’ve paid myself and how I’m applying those funds to my wealth portfolio. I take screen shots of my investment accounts and post them as proof.

So you see, I’m following the principle of SlowFi wealth building because I believe in the principle of practicing what I preach.

As I like to say… “the journeybegins with the first step”.

If you see value in this article then please be sure to like and subscribe to the blog if you haven’t done so already. I’ll be putting up more wealth building posts in the future and you can have them delivered straight to your email account.

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I’ll see you in the next post. Until next time… be sure to comment below and let’s get some dialogue going. I’m curious to know, what’s your opinion on slowfi wealth building?

One last thing, follow me on twitter for daily tweets and updates https://twitter.com/RFinancially

Follow me on twitter


 Click on the link and follow me on twitter for daily tweets and updates https://twitter.com/RFinancially

https://twitter.com/RFinancially